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The March to Valley Forge by William Trego, 1883 (Museum of the American Revolution)
As his army marched into Valley Forge on December 19, Washington hoped that his officers and soldiers, with "one heart" and "one mind," would surmount the troubles that lay ahead of them.  The lack of proper clothing was a significant problem. While Washington knew most of his men were fit for duty, he calculated that at least a third of them had no shoes. Many did not have a decent coat to protect against the constant rain that plagued the camp.
 
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Christmas at Valley Forge
 
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General Washington  at Valley Forge
 


 

On April 21, 1778,

General Washington wrote to Lt. Col. John Banister: 
 

"No history ... can furnish an instance of an army's suffering such uncommon hardships as ours has done, and bearing them with the same patience and fortitude-- 
 

... To see men without clothes to cover their nakedness, without blankets to lay on, without shoes, by which their marches might be traced by the blood from their feet, and almost as often without provisions ... 


 

... marching through frost and snow, and at Christmas taking up their winter quarters within a day's march of the enemy, without a house or hut to cover them 


... and submitting to it without a murmur, is a mark of patience and obedience which in my opinion can scarce be paralleled." 

 

President Calvin Coolidge told the Daughters of the American Revolution, April 19, 1926: 

"We have been told of the unselfish devotion of the women who gave their own warm garments to fashion clothing for the suffering Continental Army during that bitter winter at Valley Forge.  

Of the wives and children who followed the Army, mending clothes, doing laundry and scavenging for food, an estimated 500 died.

The burdens of the war were not all borne by the men ..." 
 
 
 
 

Lutheran Pastor Henry Muhlenberg, whose sons Peter and Frederick served in the First U.S. Congress, wrote in The Notebook of a Colonial Clergyman: 
 

"I heard a fine example today, namely that His Excellency General Washington rode around among his army yesterday and admonished each to fear God, to put away wickedness... and to practice Christian virtues." 

 
 
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The Aircraft Carrier USS Essex CV-9

(Photos & copy from Wikipedia)
USS Essex (CV-9) in 1943, prior to any modernization
 
USS Essex (CV/CVA/CVS-9) was an aircraft carrier and the lead ship of the 24-ship Essex class built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was named after the town and county of Massachusetts and was the fourth US Navy ship to bear the name. Commissioned in December 1942, Essex participated in several campaigns in the Pacific Theater of Operations, earning the Presidential Unit Citation and 13 battle stars. Decommissioned shortly after the end of the war, she was modernized and recommissioned in the early 1950s as an attack carrier (CVA), eventually becoming an antisubmarine aircraft carrier (CVS). In her second career, she served mainly in the Atlantic, playing a role in the Cuban Missile Crisis. She also participated in the Korean War, earning four battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation. She was the primary recovery carrier for the Apollo 7 space mission.

She was decommissioned for the last time in 1969, and sold by the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Service (DRMS) for scrap on 1 June 1975. [1]

File:USS Essex (CV-9) - January 1960.jpg

The modernized Essex with an angled flight deck, seen in heavy seas in 1960.

Please click on the URL below for a compelling video from the USS Essex CV-9.  Footage donated by CriticalPast. 

https://www.youtube.com/embed/jpt6Bvr.2L-s?rel=0&controls=0&showinf

GOD bless the USA - GOD bless the USA - GOD bless the USA - GOD bless the USA - GOD bless the USA -GOD bless the USA - GOD bless the USA

The U.S. Receives Fallen Service Members’ Remains From North Korea

The United Nations Command, with support from U.S. Forces Korea, repatriated 55 cases of remains of fallen U.S. service members returned by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, also known as North Korea.

United Nations Command returned 55 cases of remains from the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, also known as North Korea, to Osan Air Base, South Korea, July 27, 2018. Members of the command and the Osan community were on hand at the arrival ceremony. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Ashley Tyler

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United Nations Honor Guard members carry the remains during a dignified return ceremony at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, Friday. Members of the command and the Osan community were on hand at the arrival ceremony. (Photo by U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kelsey Tucker.)
United Nations Honor Guard members carry the remains of fallen service members during a dignified return ceremony at Osan Air Base, South Korea, July 27, 2018. Members of the command and the Osan community were on hand at the arrival ceremony. Army photo by Sgt. Quince Lanford
 
United Nations Command Chaplain Army Col. Sam Lee performs a blessing of sacrifice and remembrance on the 55 cases of remains returned by North Korea at Osan Air Base, South Korea, July 27, 2018. Army photo by Sgt. Quince Lanford
United Nations Command Chaplain Army Col. Sam Lee performs a blessing of sacrifice and remembrance on the 55 cases of remains returned by North Korea at Osan Air Base, South Korea, July 27, 2018. Army photo by Sgt. Quince Lanford
 
GOD Bless the USA - GOD Bless the USA - GOD Bless the USA - GOD Bless the USA - GOD Bless the USA
 
 
 
 

 

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